Register FREE
SCORE:
[R]eset Puzzle
[S]ave Puzzle
Print version

SetSquare leaderboard

How to play

SetSquare starting puzzle
This is an example of a completed SetSquare grid. The aim of this puzzle is to insert the numbers 1 to 9 (once and only once) in to the grid, so that the calculations are all satisfied.
Note that these calculations are done in left-to-right order, and not in PEMDAS/BIDMAS order. If we look at the calculation on the bottom row, we can see this in action, i.e. in left-to-right order this does give us the result of 26, but applying PEMDAS/BIDMAS rules would give 21.
SetSquare starting puzzle
This is an example of a SetSquare starting grid - depending on the difficulty level, we can be given a starting number. The best way to start a SetSquare puzzle is to look for calculations where there aren't that many possibilities.
Looking at the calculation on the bottom row, we have (8+A)xB = 55. We know that the only multiplications that give us 55 are 5x11 and 11x5. Cell B can't be 11 as this is not allowed by the rules. This means that cell B must be 5, and 8+A must be 11, i.e. A must be 3.
SetSquare starting puzzle
If we look at the left column, we have A÷B+8 = 11, i.e. A÷B = 3. Again, there is a limited number of ways we can satisfy this calculation,
  1.    9 ÷ 3 = 3
  2.    6 ÷ 2 = 3
  3.    3 ÷ 1 = 3
We already have a 3 in this grid, this removes the first and last options, leaving only the second option left, i.e. cell A is 6, cell B is 2.
SetSquare starting puzzle
Looking at the top row, we have tha 6xAxB = 54. There is a limited number of ways we can satisfy this,
  1.    6x9x1 = 54
  2.    6x1x9 = 54
  3.    6x3x3 = 54
We can remove the last option as this would mean that we have a '3' in the grid twice, which is not allowed. This means that cells A and B must be 1 and 9, we just don't know which order yet. At this point we would use pencil marks for this.
Looking at the middle column, we have (A+C)x3 = 39, i.e. A+C=13. Let's look at the different ways we can do this,
  1.    4+9 = 13
  2.    5+8 = 13
  3.    6+7 = 13
  4.    7+6 = 13
  5.    8+5 = 13
  6.    9+4 = 13
We can remove options 2, 3, 4, and 5 since that would mean using the same number twice. This leaves us with cells A and C being 4 and 9, we just don't know the order.
Combining both of these means that cell A must 9, cell B must 1, and cell C must 4.
SetSquare starting puzzle
The only number we are now missing is 7, and that completes this SetSquare puzzle!

Try our other puzzles!


Nonograms

Wordsearch

Nurikabe

Jigsaw Sudoku

Samurai Sudoku

Sudoku

Mathdoku

16×16 Giant Sudoku

Hitori

X-Sudoku

Kids Sudoku

12×12 Giant Sudoku

Hyper Sudoku

Futoshiki

Towers

Killer Sudoku

Greater Than Sudoku

Maze

Arrow Sudoku

Center-Dot Sudoku

Consecutive Sudoku

Odd-Even Sudoku

SudokuXV

Network

Minesweeper

Hashi

SlitherLink

TicTacToe

CellBlocks

Suguru

Kakuro

Train Tracks

Battleships

Masyu

Light Up

Shakashaka

Fillomino

Numberlink

Suko

SetSquare

Picross

Solitare